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Cancer Control and Survivorship (CCS)

The Cancer Control and Survivorship Program of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center is a multi-disciplinary program focusing on three thematic areas: (a) Measure, Analyze and Interpret Quality of Life (QOL), (b) Understand and Improve Cancer Survivorship, and (c) Symptom Management and Supportive Care.

Membership Roster

The Program Leader is Frank J. Penedo, PhD, an accomplished clinical health psychologist whose research focuses on psychosocial and biobehavioral determinants of adjustment to cancer and the efficacy of manualized interventions on QOL and health outcomes with emphasis on ethnic minorities, and the Program Co-Leader is Melissa Simon.

The objective of the Cancer Control and Survivorship Program, which is comprised of 38 faculty members from 13 departments and 2 schools is to facilitate and focus research on secondary cancer control and survivorship within the Cancer Center. Between August 2007 and July 2012, there were 545 cancer-relevant publications from the program members, with 26.6% representing intra-programmatic and 31.4% representing inter-programmatic collaborations. A total of 7,138 participants were enrolled in program studies with 2,802 enrolled on intervention studies and 4,336 enrolled on observational or correlative studies.

Total cancer relevant funding for the Program is $14,818,344, with 70% coming from peer reviewed funding. Peer reviewed funding is $10,367,715 (total) and $7,612,441 (direct), with $1,819,740 (23.9%) from NCI and $5,792,702 from other peer reviewed sources.

Areas of research include: measurement science, determinants of optimal survivorship including basic mechanisms, psychosocial interventions and educational programs, and symptom palliation. The contribution of program efforts in improving quality of life, state of the art assessment of patient reported outcomes and palliation of cancer-related physical and psychosocial symptom burden via psychosocial interventions, coupled with community based activities, support the significance of this work.

The Program is highly innovative as it involves multiple projects implementing cutting edge technology. The Program actively seeks to improve cancer control and survivorship by developing and implementing methodologically sound, clinically relevant and highly innovative research initiatives that are clinically effective and translational, aimed to reduce the burden of cancer across multiple communities. Members' interests and capabilities span many disciplines. Their integrated focus upon cancer control and survivorship promotes an environment of intra- and inter-program collaboration and productivity.

The goals of the Cancer Control and Survivorship Program are to:

  1. Strengthen and develop programs to improve the measurement, analysis and interpretation of quality of life (QOL) and other patient-reported outcomes.
  2. Strengthen our understanding of cancer survivorship and develop targeted interventions that promote optimal survivorship.
  3. To strengthen and develop programs targeting the acute and long term effects of cancer and cancer-related therapies, and improve symptom management and supportive care.