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Northwestern Memorial Maintains Magnet Status for Nursing Excellence

Northwestern Memorial Maintains Magnet Status for Nursing Excellence A national honor achieved by only 6 percent of hospitals

December 2010

Northwestern Memorial Hospital, the primary teaching hospital of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, announced the renewal of its Magnet status, the gold standard for nursing excellence. The honor is determined by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and recognizes an organizational commitment to the best in patient care.

"Magnet status sets our hospital apart and places us amongst a very small group of institutions with top-tier standards for nursing," said Michelle Janney, RN, PhD, NEA-BC, senior vice president and Wood-Prince Family chief nurse executive at Northwestern Memorial. "We have a wonderful team of nursing staff and nursing leadership who collectively are responsible for the achievement of this great honor. Ensuring the very best standards in patient care is integral to our shared Northwestern Medicine vision, and Magnet is a big part of our commitment to be the destination of choice for quality healthcare."

Long recognized for its high standards in nursing quality, Northwestern Memorial first achieved the four-year Magnet status in 2006 through a rigorous application and review process. In 2010, Northwestern Memorial applied for and was granted re-designation as a Magnet hospital by the ANCC following a five-day site survey and comprehensive follow-up analysis. Approximately 6 percent of the nation's hospitals and healthcare organizations have been recognized with Magnet status and only 3 percent are renewed.

Research demonstrates that patients largely benefit from visiting a hospital with Magnet status. Magnet hospitals report fewer patient falls, less medication error, lower mortality and higher patient and family satisfaction. Magnet hospitals also tend to have lower nursing turnover and an improved nurse work environment. "This is an honor that builds on our Patients First mission and recognizes the exceptional work being done every day by our nurses as well as the caregivers, physicians and employees who distinguish our hospital as one of the leading teaching hospitals in the nation," added Janney.

Hundreds of employees throughout the organization contributed time and effort to the Magnet application and review process, which culminated with the ANCC's site visit in November.

The Magnet Recognition Program was established in 1993 to recognize healthcare organizations that exhibit excellence in nursing, and measures such things as quality of nursing leadership, nurse and physician relationships, quality improvement and opportunities for professional development.

(Last updated on June 21, 2013 )