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Types of Cancer: Lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma, also called Hodgkin's disease, is one category of lymphoma, a cancer of the lymph system. Lymphoma begins when cells in the lymph system change and grow uncontrollably, which may form a tumor.

The lymph system is made up of thin tubes that branch out to all parts of the body. Its job is to fight infection and disease. The lymph system carries lymph, a colorless fluid containing lymphocytes (white blood cells). Lymphocytes fight germs in the body. B-lymphocytes (also called B cells) make antibodies to fight bacteria, and T-lymphocytes (also called T cells) kill viruses and foreign cells and trigger the B cells to make antibodies.

Groups of bean-shaped organs called lymph nodes are located throughout the body at different areas in the lymph system. Lymph nodes are found in clusters in the abdomen, groin, pelvis, underarms, and neck. Other parts of the lymph system include the spleen, which makes lymphocytes and filters blood; the thymus, an organ under the breastbone; and the tonsils, which are located in the throat.
Imagery-based Relaxation for
Patients with Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma (CTCL)

Mind-body strategies such as guided imagery can be used to manage stress, anxiety and reduce physical distress. Lurie Cancer Center clinical health psychologist, Lynne I. Wagner, PhD, leads this 15 minute guided imagery session for patients with CTCL.

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Hodgkin lymphoma most commonly affects lymph nodes, usually beginning in the neck or the area between the lungs and behind the breastbone. It can also begin in groups of lymph nodes under the arms, in the groin, or in the abdomen or pelvis. If Hodgkin lymphoma spreads, it may spread to the spleen, liver, bone marrow, or bone. Spread to other parts of the body can also occur, but it is unusual.

There are different types of Hodgkin lymphoma. It is important to know the type, as this may affect the choice of treatment. Doctors determine the type of Hodgkin lymphoma by how the cells in a tissue sample look under a microscope and whether the cells contain abnormal patterns of certain proteins.

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a term that refers to many, very different types of cancer of the lymph system. Lymphoma begins when cells in the lymph system change and grow uncontrollably, which may form a tumor. The lymph system is made up of thin tubes that branch out to all parts of the body. Its job is to fight infection and disease. The lymph system carries lymph, a colorless fluid containing lymphocytes (white blood cells). Lymphocytes fight germs in the body. B-lymphocytes (also called B cells) make antibodies to fight bacteria, and T-lymphocytes (also called T cells) kill viruses and foreign cells and trigger the B cells to make antibodies.

Groups of tiny, bean-shaped organs called lymph nodes are located throughout the body at different sites in the lymph system. Lymph nodes are found in clusters in the abdomen, groin, pelvis, underarms, and neck. Other parts of the lymph system include the spleen, which makes lymphocytes and filters blood; the thymus, an organ under the breastbone; the tonsils, located in the throat; and the bone marrow, the spongy red tissue inside bones that produces white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets (cells that help the blood clot).

Because lymph tissue is found in so many parts of the body, NHL can start almost anywhere and can spread to almost any organ in the body. It most often begins in the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, or bone marrow, but can also involve the stomach, intestines, skin, thyroid gland, and brain or any other part of the body.

There are different types and many subtypes of NHL. It is very important to know which type and subtype has been diagnosed because the type and subtype help doctors determine the best treatment and a patient's chance of recovery.

For additional information on risk factors, screening, diagnosis and more visit the following links at Cancer.Net:
Hodgkin Lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma




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